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Cream of Chicken Soup

Since making Boston Roast was sadly out of the question, I decided to make Cream of Chicken soup.

The Recipe -
Cream of Chicken Soup – Mrs. J.J. Feltus

To Make Cream of Chicken Soup, cut a stalk of celery into several pieces, and half an onion into thin slices. Put the vegetables into two cups of milk and heat slowly, let stand 10 minutes and remove vegetables, beat 2 slightly rounded tablespoons each of flour and butter together with a few grains of pepper and 1/2 even teaspoon of salt. Stir in the hot milk. Add 2 cupfuls of the broth reserved from boiling of foul, stir until smooth and cook 15 minutes in the double boiler. This will make a fine soup but as an extra touch beat the yolk of an egg with 4 tablespoons cream. Add to the soup and when egg thickens, serve at once.

Pans are ready.

Pans are ready.

The milk is whole milk from Richardson's in Middleton.

The milk is whole milk from Richardson’s in Middleton.

Making a Roux with butter and flour.

Making a Roux with butter and flour.

The double boiler is now ready to cook for 15 minutes.

The double boiler is now ready to cook for 15 minutes.

Egg Yolk and cream for the rich finish.

Egg Yolk and cream for the rich finish.

The Finished Soup!

The Finished Soup!

Miss S. gives it a thumbs up.

Miss S. gives it a thumbs up.

Ernie thinks it needs a little more something...

Ernie thinks it needs a little more something…

In my opinion, it did need a little more something. So I added more pepper which helped. We had it with egg noodles and peas, because Miss S asked for noodles for dinner. Ernie added sriracha sauce. I’ll make it again, with some tweaking of spice levels/types.

- Kate

Dinner shall be ….. (and Cream of Chicken Soup)

Boston Roast.

Except Boston Roast has no meat/roast.

Boston Roast

One cup lima beans, uncooked, soaked overnight. 2 pounds grated cheese, 1/2 teaspoon salt. Pass beans and pimentos (WHERE did the Pimentos come from?!!? A jar. I know, I know.) through meat grinder. Bread crubs sufficient to stiffen and roll. Bake in oven, basting with water and butter. Serve with tomato sauce, onion added if desired.

I don’t have a meat grinder. I have a food mill though. And I don’t have lima beans in the house.

Boston Roast is a cut of meat, however. So did the recipe submitted expect me to know this as a given? I need to do more research and/or some of you lovely followers can help me out in the comments. (I think I have followers. I could be just sending out phosphors into what is the internet.)

I will make this for dinner. I promise. Ernie may not eat it. It may just be me, the pickiest eater in the house eating this before Sunday night.

I’m making Cream of Chicken soup tonight and will have pictures on the next blog post. I need Cream of Chicken soup for dinner and I can’t eat Canned Soups due to the MSG content.

Cream of Chicken Soup – Mrs. J.J. Feltus

To Make Cream of Chicken Soup, cut a stalk of celery into several pieces, and half an onion into thin slices. Put the vegetables into two cups of milk and heat slowly, let stand 10 minutes and remove vegetables, beat 2 slightly rounded tablespoons each of flour and butter together with a few grains of pepper and 1/2 even teaspoon of salt. Stir in the hot milk. Add 2 cupfuls of the broth reserved from boiling of foul, stir until smooth and cook 15 minutes in the double boiler. This will make a fine soup but as an extra touch beat the yolk of an egg with 4 tablespoons cream. Add to the soup and when egg thickens, serve at once.

Pictures and results later!

- Kate

Pick our Dinner!

Now that I might be past the migraine cycle I’ve been in, (fingers crossed!), I’m back to blogging and cooking.  

 

I’ve found several interesting choices for what would be our dinner for tomorrow evening.

To make things even more fun, I’m going to let you pick what I’m cooking from the recipe title alone.  :)  So in no particular order here are the choices:

1. Boiled Egg and Sausage Meat – just what it says..

2. Boston Roast – this involves Lima beans.

3. “Konbee” Noodle – this has meat in it and noodles….

Don’t they sound yummy?  Uh-huh.  When I asked my husband, Ernie if he’d like one of these for dinner, he looked slightly squeamish.  Or maybe it was horrified.  Either way I’m not telling which one it was. 

I’m also going to have to make more of Hermit recipe # 1 as they um, disappeared before I could send them to my brother in El Paso.  He’s currently stationed there with his family.  Hermit recipe # 2 will get another try out  - with Tena’s suggestion of trying them as lace cookies – and with the addition of flour to the batter. (Thanks, Tena for the info about the raisins and the suggestion for trying to get Hermit # 2 to work as published.) I’d love to have some gluten free options for people!

The recipe with the most number of votes becomes my family’s dinner!

- Kate

Recipe # 2 – Hermits # 2

One of the most important things to do is read the recipe through before you start.  This can prevent mistakes from happening, and it will make sure that you have all the ingredients you need on hand before you begin.  It also can point out potential problems.

Hermit Recipe # 2 has problems.  Sadly, as there is no way to contact Mrs. H.L. Wood, I can’t just pick up the phone and call her to say, “Excuse me, but I think you forgot something in your Hermit recipe that you gave to the church cookbook.”  Tracking down her ancestors might be possible, but due to time constraints, it’s not really feasible.

The recipe is as follows:

One and one half cups brown sugar, 1/2 cup lard, 1 egg, 4 tablespoons sweet milk, 1 cup chopped raisins, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoon cloves, 1 nutmeg, 1 teaspoon Royal Baking Powder.  Cut out, sprinkle sugar over the top. – Mrs. H.L. Wood

Do you see what is missing?  Flour.  Now, I make peanut butter cookies without flour, so It could work.(Thanks to Mac’s Mom for that recipe.) Sweet milk is non sour, non spoiled milk.  Also, if you chill your knife before you chop the raisins, it makes it easier and less sticky. (Thanks to Mac for the suggestion!)  So – Onward.

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The ingredients prior to mixing.

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Mixed together!  It smells wonderful, but after I added egg, the batter is very wet.  Color me dubious at this point.

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Ready to bake in a 350 degree oven. (Maybe)

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After 10 minutes in the oven.  First failure of the year!   

I don’t have time to start again right now, but maybe after dinner I will tonight.  I was hoping that these would work, but I really felt strongly that they would not.  I can try chilling the batter, but I’m pretty sure that I’m going to have to add some flour.

Right now, the clear winner with the hermit recipes is recipe number 1, Mrs. Cumming’s recipe.  My in house beta cookie tester, says they are quite good and not overly sweet.  I wanted more spice, but we’ll see if I can get Mrs. Wood’s recipe to work.

- Kate

(And when they invent the telephone hotline to departed chefs/cooks, I’m going to want to know about it.  Something tells me that I’m going to be wishing I could pick up the phone and ask – what does this mean?)

 

 

 

 

Recipe Number 1 – Hermits # 1

Hermits are a simple cookie with fruit – usually raisins in them. When I was a kid, we’d get them from Klink’s Bakery on Cabot St. My reason for starting with these cookies was two fold. 1) They are cookies. (It’s hard to screw up cookies.) 2) My brother who is in the Army and is stationed in Texas, was asking about Hermits on Facebook.
The Congregational Cook Book has two Hermit recipes in it, so I figured I’d make both and send my brother and his family some Hermits.

Hermit recipe # 1 comes from Mrs. S. Cummings

Use 2/3 cup butter, 2 cups brown sugar, 1 cup chopped raisins, 1/4 cup warm water, 1 teaspoonful cinnamon, 1 teaspoonful soda, 2 eggs and 3 cups of flour. Drop from spoon and bake quickly.

Well, this is fairly straight forward, and I’ll go with a 350 degree oven for 10 minutes.

Cookie dough - with butter, sugar, cinnamon, soda, warm water and two eggs.

Cookie dough – with butter, sugar, cinnamon, soda, warm water and two eggs.

After 3 cups of flour have been added.

After 3 cups of flour have been added.

After 10 minutes in a 350 degree oven.

After 10 minutes in a 350 degree oven.

Interior cookie - still warm.

Interior cookie – still warm.

Recipe notes – mixed entirely by hand, used light brown sugar, large eggs. Yield – 2 1/2 to 3 dozen.

Initial Verdict – A nice cookie, with good mouth feel. These were easy to make with the only time consuming part being chopping the raisins. Next time I will chill the knife to make it easier. I want to add more spice than the cinnamon though. How will they compare to Hermit # 2? You’ll see tomorrow and my brother will get a box of both in the mail.

Kate

Welcome to Cooking in the 13′s

Originally posted on Cooking in the 13's:

This blog started with the discovery of a cookbook – a church cookbook from 1913. It is “The Congregational Cook Book” with the date of 1913 printed on the cover.  The title page states that was compiled by the Ladies Guild of St. Paul’s Congregational Church of Nutley, NJ.

As I began to carefully look through the cookbook, the idea to cook a recipe a day came to me.  I’m just a home cook, like the women who submitted their recipes a hundred years ago.  I do not have any formal training in how to cook.

My thought is that this will be a learning experience on many levels. I may have to do some research and I’m going to have to set some ground rules for myself. I’m allowing myself the use of my hand mixer, the stand mixture with the dough hook for bread recipes only, along with…

View original 98 more words

Welcome to Cooking in the 13′s

This blog started with the discovery of a cookbook – a church cookbook from 1913. It is “The Congregational Cook Book” with the date of 1913 printed on the cover.  The title page states that was compiled by the Ladies Guild of St. Paul’s Congregational Church of Nutley, NJ.

As I began to carefully look through the cookbook, the idea to cook a recipe a day came to me.  I’m just a home cook, like the women who submitted their recipes a hundred years ago.  I do not have any formal training in how to cook.

My thought is that this will be a learning experience on many levels. I may have to do some research and I’m going to have to set some ground rules for myself. I’m allowing myself the use of my hand mixer, the stand mixture with the dough hook for bread recipes only, along with the oven/stove, and my can opener. I’m on the fence about the use of the blender. I’ve already decided that the electric fry pan, sandwich press, and other electric appliances including the microwave and the food processor are off limits.
I’m going to try to follow the recipes as best I can. We have a local dairy, Richardson’s that has been around since the 1700′s, so I’ll buy milk and cream from them.

Thank you for taking the time to follow me on this adventure. I think we are going to have fun and learn something.
- Kate

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